Turn A Triangle Into A Rectangle

No, it’s not magic, it’s simple crochet joining of triangle motifs into rectangular strips so you can make a blanket.

This is a combined viewer request video.

One person wanted to know how to connect triangles into a blanket and the other wanted to see how to whip stitch motifs together.

Not only did I whip stitch, but I also joined with a single crochet join so you can see both techniques. One will create an almost invisible seam (whipstitch), whereas the other (single crochet) will give a fun 3D effect to one side of your blanket/project. Check out the video below to learn more.

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Slip Stitch Join Tutorial

Today’s tutorial will show you how to join any two pieces of crochet with the slip stitch join. This join, unlike most others, has an added benefit of being able to join your pieces anywhere throughout the work. You can join the edges, the middles, or anywhere in between. If you would prefer a video tutorial of this join click here.

The first step is to decide where and what you will join. For this tutorial I’m going to join the edge, so I first put the right sides together.

I line up the stitches when joining edges to easily insert my hook through both pieces of my work.
I line up the stitches when joining edges to easily insert my hook through both pieces of my work.

Note: You don’t always have to put the right sides together when using this join, especially if you are joining in other places than the edges. The only thing to remember is that you need to start the first stitch near an edge because you will have one yarn over that will wrap around the both pieces.

Next, I insert my hook where I want to begin my join.

Since I'm joining edges, I insert my hook under both loops of both pieces in the first stitch at the corner.
Since I’m joining edges, I insert my hook under both loops of both pieces in the first stitch at the corner.

Note: You can also insert your hook through just the inside or outside loops of each side for a different effect.

Now, yarn over and pull the loop back through the pieces and through the loop on your hook.

slst3
Your first slip stitch is now complete, but wait… there’s more.

Before moving on to the next stitch, be sure to tighten the one you just made down.

Continue to tighten down each stitch as you make them to form a tight join.
Continue to tighten down each stitch as you make them to form a tight join.

Continue in the next stitch or space that you want to join and work your way across the edge or area you want to join.

I've made a slip stitch in each stitch across this edge and tighten them down as I went.
I’ve made a slip stitch in each stitch across this edge and tighten them down as I went.

Here is a view of the backside of the join. If you are using this stitch to join things other than edges and want it visible, you can choose between the two sides that you want for the front.

This side gives you small dashes while the other side gives you a series of slip stitch "V"s.
This side gives you small dashes while the other side gives you a series of slip stitch “V”s.

Once I open the pieces up you can see where the join shows up in the contrasting color I used.

If I used the green yarn to join, my join would be nearly invisible.
If I used the green yarn to join, my join would be nearly invisible.

One thing to know about this join is that the resulting edge (if that is what you are joining) will be slightly raised. If you need a flat seam with no raised edging, you would be better off using the Mattress stitch join or Whipstitch join.

Here you can see how the seam looks from the side. Notice it stitcks out slightly.
Here you can see how the seam looks from the side. Notice it sticks out slightly.

What’s your favorite kind of join? Let me know below and thanks for stopping by!

Single Crochet Join Tutorial

Today’s tutorial will show you how to join two pieces of crochet together using the simple single crochet stitch. This join is about the most sturdy you can make, so it’s great for projects that will get lots of wear and tear. To see a video tutorial on this method, click here.

To begin this join you will put the two pieces you want to join together with the right sides facing each other.

Line up the stitches for easy joining.
Line up the stitches for easy joining.

 

With a slip knot already on your hook, insert it through the first stitch of both pieces to begin your join.

 

You can enter you hook under both loops or just the inside or outside.  I like to put my hook under both loops.
You can enter you hook under both loops or just the inside or outside.
I like to put my hook under both loops.

 

Next, just like a single crochet, yarn over and pull up the loop through both pieces.

 

If it's difficult to pull the hook through, separate the pieces slightly so you can pull through just two loops at a time.
If it’s difficult to pull the hook through, separate the pieces slightly so you can pull through just two loops at a time.

 

Now, yarn over and finish off your first single crochet.

 

You can begin your first joining stitch wherever you need, it doesn't just have to be at the end of your pieces.
You can begin your first joining stitch wherever you need, it doesn’t just have to be at the end of your pieces.

 

Important Step: Before beginning your next stitch, tighten down the previous stitch. This gives a nice tight join.

 

Tighten down every stitch you make the same way.
Tighten down every stitch you make the same way.

 

 

 

Continue down your entire seam single crocheting into every stitch you come to.

 

If there are not any stitches to work into (like side rows of pieces) just work them as evenly across as you can.
If there are not any stitches to work into (like side rows of pieces) just work them as evenly across as you can.

 

Once you reach the end, fasten off and weave in the ends. I’ve used a contrasting color for this tutorial so you can see exactly what shows through to the right side of your work.

 

If this was worked in the green, this seam would be pretty much invisible.
If this was worked in the green, this seam would be pretty much invisible.

 

Be warned that this join will create a raised seam. If you need a flat seam you can try the mattress seam or whipstitch seam which will give you a nice flat seam.

 

This seam super sturdy construction makes a three dimensional seam.
This seam’s super sturdy construction makes a three dimensional seam.

 

 

 

 

 

How to Whipstitch Join

Up next in my crochet joining tutorials is the Whipstitch seam. This is another great join when you want a flat seam and it is a really easy seam to make. All you will need are the pieces you want to join, a length of yarn to join them with and a yarn or tapestry needle to make the join. If you would like to see a video on this technique, you can click here to go check it out.

So to get started, you want to put the right sides together of the two pieces you want to join. Be sure to line up your “V”s (stitches) to be able to stitch through them easier.

Notice my stitches are lined up, now I can easily sew through both layers much faster.
Notice my stitches are lined up, now I can easily sew through both layers much faster.

Now I begin on the right side of my two pieces (you can start on the left side if you prefer) and insert my needle through just the outside loops of my bottom most stitches. I will be working from bottom to top with this join.

You can insert your needle through both loops, but I like the effect the outside loops give (you'll see what I mean at the end).
You can insert your needle through both loops, but I like the effect the inside loops give (you’ll see what I mean at the end).

I pull my yarn through the stitches and then bring my needle back across my pieces and insert it again from the right side of my project for the next set of stitches.

If you began on the left, be sure to go back over to the left side for the next stitch join.
If you began on the left, be sure to go back over to the left side for the next stitch join.

Then go through the outside loop of the second piece.

Go through both outside loops to join the next set of stitches.
Go through both outside loops to join the next set of stitches.

As you work, you can either tighten the yarn as you go or leave it slightly slack until the end of the seam.

I've left the seam slack here so I can tighten at the end. Notice for my next stitch, I again come from the right to start the join.
I’ve left the seam slack here so I can tighten at the end. Notice for my next stitch, I again come from the right to start the join.

You will repeat the steps of inserting your needle through both outside loops then coming back to the same side you started the join to make the next stitch. It is almost like stitching in a circle around your two pieces.

Continue the steps until you get to the end of your piece or the end of the seam you are joining.
Continue the steps until you get to the end of your piece or the end of the seam you are joining.

Once you finish the seam, if you haven’t already, take your tails and tighten the stitches down to get a tight, closed seam.

If you beginning tail isn't anchored to anything, hold each tail with one hand and pull to tighten. If is already anchored just hold onto the very beginning of the seam when tightening the tail.
If you beginning tail isn’t anchored to anything, hold each tail with one hand and pull to tighten.
If is already anchored just hold onto the very beginning of the seam when tightening the tail.

Once you tighten you are ready to open your seam and check out the handy work.

This is the wrong side of the work. You can see the bars from where we exited one side and went in the other.
This is the wrong side of the work. You can see the bars from where we exited one side and went in the other.

This seam is not as invisible as the mattress stitch join, but if worked in a matching color as the main piece it should be almost invisible.

Here is the right side and you can see the small bars that appear in the contrasting color I used for joining.
Here is the right side and you can see the small bars that appear in the contrasting color I used for joining.
Also notice the inside loops I didn’t join when stitching became a nice visual spot on each side of the seam.

The seam will be almost flat which makes this a nice seam for clothing where a raised seam may not be comfortable. If you have any questions, don’t be afraid to ask them below. I will get back to you as quick as possible!

Mattress Stitch Join Tutorial

This join I’m about to show you has to be one of my favorites. It leaves a flat almost invisible seam and is very easy to do. All you will need is a piece of yarn  (usually in the same color as your project) and slightly longer than the length you are joining, a yarn or tapestry needle and your project pieces. If you would like to see a video tutorial of this technique you can click here.

To begin your mattress join, first you will put the two pieces you want to join together.

Make sure your "right sides" are facing each other.
Make sure your “right sides” are facing each other and your stitches (or “V”s as I like to call them) are lined up for easy stitching.

Then beginning at the bottom of your seam, you will insert your needle through the outside loop only of your bottom stitch. Come from the outside of your work to the inside when inserting your needle.

Note: It’s not important which side of the project you begin on. You can come in from right to left as shown in the photo below, or start on the left piece and work from left to right.

Working through the outside loop only will produce a nice effect that you will see at the end of the tutorial.
Working through the outside loop only will produce a nice effect that you will see at the end of the tutorial.

Now, bring your needle straight across and insert it through the outside loop on the same stitch on the second piece.

Notice I bring the needle from the inside to the outside of the other piece.
Notice I bring the needle from the inside to the outside of the other piece.

You can see when I pull the yarn all the way through I have made a straight line through my outside loops.

You can easily see where the yarn is with the contrasting color I'm using. For a real project, I would normally use the same color to join and the main project.
You can easily see where the yarn is with the contrasting color I’m using. For a real project, I would normally use the same color to join and the main project.

The next step is what distinguishes this stitch from others. You will now bring your needle up to the next stitch on the same side you just worked on and insert it in the outside loop only.

Now I come from the outside and put the needle to the inside towards my other piece.
Now I come from the outside and put the needle to the inside towards my other piece.

Now I will go through the outside loop again on the other piece I am connecting.

Straight across from the inside to the outside again.
Straight across from the inside to the outside again.

You can see when I pull the yarn though this second stitch that this stitch kind of weaves it way back and forth along the stitches.

I haven't tighten the stitches yet, but you can as you work. I'm saving the magic for the end of the tutorial.
I haven’t tighten the stitches yet, but you can as your work. I’m saving the magic for the end of the tutorial.

Now I repeat the pattern, I go up one stitch on the same side I just came out of to insert my needle again.

Each time you finish stitching across both sides, you start the next stitch on the same side as the last one.
Each time you finish stitching across both sides, you start the next stitch on the same side as the last one.

I continue this pattern all the way to the end of my seam.

Still haven't pull the stitches tight, just quickly worked my way up the pieces.
Still haven’t pull the stitches tight, just quickly worked my way up the pieces.

Now the magic, take your ends and pull them tight.

My slack yarn is now almost one straight piece that is about as long as my seam. This join is great when you are running out of yarn.
My slack yarn is now almost one straight piece that is about as long as my seam. This join is great when you are running out of yarn.

From the wrong side you can slightly see the yarn I used to join. If it was in the same color as my project, you wouldn’t even notice it.

Not too bad, but wait till I turn it over.
Not too bad, but wait till I turn it over.

Now for the front side, even with the contrasting color, you can’t really see any of the yarn I used to join the seam. And the piece is completely flat, no 3 dimensional seam here.

My needle is pointing out the cool "V" the inside loops I didn't stitch through made at the seam.
My needle is pointing out the cool “V” the inside loops I didn’t stitch through made at the seam.

Once you finish stitching and seaming, just work these tails in as you would any other tail. If it’s the same color as your work you can easily weave it in. If you chose a contrasting color, you can weave in keeping it on the wrong side so it won’t show up through the front.